The Soft Skin

The Soft Skin

Directed by François Truffaut • 1964 • France

François Truffaut followed up the international phenomenon Jules and Jim with this tense tale of infidelity. The unassuming Jean Desailly is perfectly cast as a celebrated literary scholar, seemingly happily married, who embarks on an affair with a gorgeous stewardess, played by Françoise Dorléac, who is captivated by his charm and reputation. As their romance gets serious, the film grows anxious, leading to a wallop of a conclusion. Truffaut made The Soft Skin at a time when he was immersing himself in the work of Alfred Hitchcock, and that master's influence can be felt throughout this complex, insightful, and underseen French New Wave treasure.

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The Soft Skin
  • The Soft Skin

    Directed by François Truffaut • 1964 • France

    François Truffaut followed up the international phenomenon Jules and Jim with this tense tale of infidelity. The unassuming Jean Desailly is perfectly cast as a celebrated literary scholar, seemingly happily married, who embarks on an affair with a g...

Extras

  • THE SOFT SKIN Commentary

    Recorded in 2000, this audio commentary features screenwriter Jean-Louis Richard and François Truffaut scholar Serge Toubiana.

  • The Complexity of Influence

    In this video essay, produced in 2014, film critic Kent Jones details how director Alfred Hitchcock influenced François Truffaut’s filmmaking, especially in THE SOFT SKIN.

  • Monsieur Truffaut Meets Mr. Hitchcock

    Made by film historian Robert Fischer in 1999, this half-hour documentary tells the story behind director François Truffaut’s famous interview book “Hitchcock,” from Truffaut’s presentation of the idea to filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock in 1962 to the book’s publication four years later.

  • Truffaut on THE SOFT SKIN

    In this excerpt from a December 1965 episode of the French television program “Cinéastes de notre temps,” director François Truffaut talks about the origins of THE SOFT SKIN, shooting its love scenes, and choreographing its finale.